Bronowski, J.

Jacob Bronowski was a mathematician, gained his M.A. and Ph.D. with honors from the University of Cambridge; Senior Lecturer in Mathematics at University College, Hull. Scientific Deputy to the British Chiefs of Staffs Mission to Japan in 1945 and wrote "The Effects of the Atomic Bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Worked for UNESCO and later became Director of the Central Research Establishment of the National Coal Board. Visited the U.S. as Carnegie Visiting Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was born in 1908 and died in 1974.

When Coleridge tried to define beauty, he returned always to one deep thought: beauty, he said, is "unity in variety." Science and Human Values, 1956

 

We have good grounds to believe, from studies of animals and men, that thinking as we understand it is made possible only by the use of names or symbols. Ibid.

 

Man masters nature not be force but by understanding. This is why science has succeeded where magic failed: because it has looked for no spell to cast on nature. Ibid.

 

The society of scientists must be a democracy. It can keep alive and grow only by a constant tension between dissent and respect, between independence from the views of others and tolerance for them. Ibid.

 

Science is not a mechanism but a human progress. Ibid.

The values by which we are to survive are not rules for just and unjust conduct, but are those illuminations in whose light justice and injustice, good and evil, means and ends are seen in fearful sharpness of outline. Ibid.

 

Man masters nature not by force but by understanding. This is why science has succeeded where magic failed; because it has looked for no spell to cast over nature, "The Creative Mind," 1953.